Crisp packet collection will help homeless people

December 22 2021

Abigail and George McCann with some of the crisp packets they have collected

Abigail and George McCann with some of the crisp packets they have collected

A SISTER and brother from Emersons Green have found a way to reduce plastic waste and help people who are sleeping rough at the same time.
Abigail McCann, aged nine, and her six-year-old brother George enlisted the help of their classmates at Emersons Green Primary School to collect 1,200 crisp packets, which are going to be turned into insulating sleeping bag covers.
A non-profit organisation called the Crisp Packet Project collects the empty, flattened packets and creates the covers by ironing them together with a plastic sheet. It takes around 150 packets to make a sleeping bag cover, so the packets the McCanns have collected should make eight of them to be given to people who are sleeping on the streets.
Abigail and George first heard about the idea last year, when their Army family was posted in Scotland and their welfare support group was collecting them.
This year they decided to organise a collection themselves at school. Word was spread in a newsletter, and staff and pupils started saving packets. Abi and George also collected them at the school gates.
Mum Jo then helped wash the packets and flatten them before counting and boxing them to send to the Crisp Packet Project.
Jo said: “I am so proud of them for doing this, not only because it’s helping people but also it’s reducing plastic waste.
“They have shown real dedication to the cause. My little boy likes litter picking and this is something relatively easy they can do that’s got quite a big impact.
“I have had to clean up a lot of crisp crumbs from the carpet!”
Emersons Green Primary School head teacher Karl Hemmings said: “We have been really pleased to support Abigail and George in their drive to collect as many crisp packets as possible for such a worthy cause.
“Children and adults across the whole school have been saving their crisp packets and we are really proud of what Abigail and George have achieved.”
For more information on the project visit crisppacketproject.com.